It’s unanimous! Why?

by Jini Stolk

I’m delighted to welcome Luminato’s new Artistic Director, who’ll be coming to us from Australia’s Melbourne Festival to helm the festival’s 2017 edition. I wish her great success in this exciting new position, and look forward to working together over the coming years.

I also warmly welcome Luminato’s new CEO; he came to us from England. I look forward to meeting the new Director and CEO of the Art Gallery of Ontario/AGO (from Honolulu); Shaw Festival’s new Artistic Director (Exeter, the U.K); The National Ballet of Canada’s Executive Director (Boston); the new Managing Director of Tafelmusik (the U.K.); and the new Director and CEO of the ROM (Salem, Massachusetts) – and to getting to know Harbourfront Centre’s wonderful new CEO (Australia) better.

I wish them all the greatest success, and hope that they’ll find the same joy as I have had in becoming part of Toronto’s and Canada’s smart, delightful and diverse cultural community.

I can’t help, though, wondering what’s up with our nation’s Hiring Committees.

There’s something to be said about our responsibilities to our own cultural community’s next generation of leaders, and our duty to develop, mentor and support them as they move to positions of increasing responsibility and prominence.

In days long past, artists and arts workers would have been noisily protesting this influx of folks from away. These days, I have quiet conversations with people who use words ranging from “outraged” to “disappointed.”

I know we have to get used to the fact that Canada is becoming an increasingly attractive employment destination/new home of choice to many people around the world. “There is a vision of what a progressive Britain could be. It’s called Canada.” according to Gaby Hinsliff in The Guardian. One of the reasons people find Canada so appealing is undoubtedly our ability to embrace new people and new ideas, remaining tolerant, relaxed and at ease in our own values and value.

But in the meantime, here’s a nice piece we might all take a look at on Steps to Developing Your Future Leaders.

 

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2 Comments

  1. Brian McCurdy says:

    I thought we had moved away from our colonial mentality years ago. Unfortunately it seems that it is alive and well. This is not to disrespect the candidtes who have filled these positions. As usual these artistic and arts management people will import the artists they know and have a relationship with. I cannot imagine this happening in Quebec, which is why they have a vibrant culture.

  2. I wonder if the question can be framed differently. While I am concerned about the pattern of hiring from outside of Canada (and from predominately white, Anglo-Saxon demographics), I am more concerned about the habit in Canadian arts to vest too much authority and control into too few roles. Decentralization of authority and influence would allow for a greater plurality of voices in decision making while making the impacts of individual hires less significant.

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